LIBRARIES that sell wine

/
/
/
/
/
/
LIBRARIES that sell wine

LIBRARIES that sell wine LIBRARIES that sell wine, provide breakfast and have comfortable sofas could be the way of the future, according to a leading international library consultant. John Stanley, who has been consulting for 30 years, said libraries needed to adopt a more progressive approach to meet the needs of today’s users. His comments follow the release of a British parliamentary report which found that local libraries were in decline and in need of urgent action to repair buildings, restock shelves and offer free internet access. Mr Stanley said the report provided libraries with a tremendous opportunity. “Let’s not decry all libraries as being behind the times,” Mr Stanley said. “Norwich, Tower Hamlets, Staffordshire, Taunton and Medway Libraries are among some of the best libraries in the world. “Some British libraries may be in decline, but they are not alone. Libraries in Australia and the USA have been in the same situation. But through implementing annual benchmarking, introducing retailing techniques, reinventing their customer service policies and creating an experience for their patrons, these libraries have not only stopped the decline, they are achieving record numbers of active memberships.” Mr Stanley, the founder of John Stanley Associates, is based in Perth, Western Australia. Both John and Ms Emberton, a John Stanley Associates international consultant, make regular visits to Britain to advise libraries about a more contemporary and dynamic approach to attracting users. John says British libraries should look at their counterparts in some cities of New Zealand to see the success of a more progressive approach. “In New Zealand, you can purchase a glass of wine at Botany Downs Library, have a working breakfast at New Plymouth Library or browse through a �living room� rather than the Dewey System at Palmerston North Library,” he said. “Libraries have a great opportunity to meet the needs of today’s customers. The old fashioned library is dying rapidly and we accept some people will be upset at its loss. But a new breed of dynamic libraries is evolving.” Fellow library consultant Fiona Emberton said developing libraries of the future was not just about capital investment. “The buildings can be redeveloped, the books restocked and the internet free but if the industry wants to see more useage of the libraries, then there also needs a cultural shift,” she said. “It is vital that the library team are involved in the changes and that they believe in the changes.” Mr Stanley and Ms Emberton can be contacted on +61 8 9293 4533